Rulings (25)
  • Brand Evangelists for Beauty Ltd

    • Upheld
    • Social media (own site)
    • 11 May 2022

    We banned an ad for making claims about a caffeinated hair product that couldn’t be substantiated.

  • Lucy Isabella Beauty & Aesthetics t/a Lucy Isabella

    • Upheld
    • Social media (own site)
    • 11 May 2022

    We banned an ad for advertising Kenalog, a prescription-only medicine, to the public.

  • Sarean Aesthetics

    • Upheld
    • Social media (own site)
    • 11 May 2022

    We banned ads for advertising prescription-only medicine to the public.

  • Skincodes Aesthetics

    • Upheld
    • Social media (own site)
    • 11 May 2022

    We banned ads for marketing prescription-only medicine to the public.

  • The Skin Clinic Faversham t/a The Skin Clinic

    • Upheld
    • Social media (own site)
    • 11 May 2022

    We banned ads for marketing prescription-only medicine to the public.

  • Liquid Lipo Ltd

    • Upheld
    • Website (own site)
    • 18 May 2022

    A product listing on a website that claimed a gel could assist with the reduction of body fat was misleading as the advertiser did not provide robust clinical evidence to prove its efficacy.

  • Person(s) unknown

    • Upheld
    • Social media (own site)
    • 20 April 2022

    Six Instagram posts by an acne treatment provider were banned for promoting prescription-only medicines to the general public.

  • Back to Normal

    • Upheld
    • Website (own site)
    • 02 March 2022

    A website post and GoFundMe page for the anti-lockdown campaign group Back to Normal was banned for making misleading claims about the effectiveness of ivermectin in treating COVID-19. 

  • The Detox Clinic Ltd

    • Upheld
    • Website (own site)
    • 02 March 2022

    A website ad promoting IV Ozone Therapy was banned for making medicinal claims without holding substantive evidence to support those claims. 

  • Steven Thomas

    • Upheld
    • 02 February 2022

    A local press ad placed by Steven Thomas, seen in the Forest of Dean and Wye Valley Review, The Forester and the Cheltenham Post in September and October 2021 featured the headline “Do you know about the MHRA Yellow Card Scheme?” with the sub-headline “Have you been vaccinated or know somebody who has? Did you know th...

  • Just Simply Change Ltd t/a Nirasha Ramlugan

    • Upheld
    • Social media (own site)
    • 22 December 2021

    A Facebook post promoting rapid transformational therapy was banned for discouraging essential treatment for conditions for which medical supervision should be sought.

  • More Than Enough Ltd t/a Rapid Transformational Therapy (RTT)

    • Upheld
    • Email
    • 22 December 2021

    A course prospectus for rapid transformational therapy was banned for making health claims which could not be supported by evidence. 

  • Pharmica Ltd

    • Upheld
    • Search (paid)
    • 03 November 2021

    An ad for erectile dysfunction pills was banned for advertising prescription-only medicines.

  • Vir Health Ltd t/a Numan

    • Upheld
    • Search (paid)
    • 03 November 2021

    We banned an ad for advertising prescription-only medicines for erectile dysfunction.

  • Tomwill (Holdings) Ltd

    • Upheld
    • Social media (paid ad), Email, Internet (website content)
    • 27 October 2021

    Six ads promoting a strategy for treating anxiety were banned for not holding evidence to support the claims and for discouraging essential treatment for conditions for which medical advice should be sought.

  • Copper Clothing Ltd t/a Copper Clothing

    • Upheld
    • Radio
    • 13 October 2021

    A radio ad for a facemask was banned for misleadingly implying that it could rapidly de-activate COVID-19 particles.

  • Gemporia Ltd

    • Upheld
    • Television
    • 13 October 2021

    A teleshopping presentation for CBD Oils was banned for misleadingly implying that the food supplements could prevent, treat or cure human disease.

  • Lyma Life Ltd

    • Upheld
    • VOD
    • 22 September 2021

    A pre-roll YouTube ad for a food supplement was banned for misleadingly claiming that it could reduce anxiety, stress, and treat other general and specific health issues. 

  • Cheshire Health & Medical Professionals LLP

    • Upheld
    • Magazine
    • 15 September 2021

    We banned an ad for a medical device claiming over misleading efficacy claims around pain relief.

  • Global EMF Solutions Ltd t/a energyDots

    • Upheld
    • Internet (website content)
    • 08 September 2021

    A website ad for a device which retunes electromagnetic frequencies was banned for misleadingly stating that the device can help users feel energised, more focused and less stressed.