Rulings (34)
  • Lynne McTaggart

    • Upheld
    • Email, Internet (website content)
    • 31 January 2024

    Two marketing emails and a website made misleading claims about alternative medicine treating medical conditions, and discouraged people seeking essential treatment for conditions for which medical supervision should be sought.

  • Medi Supplies Ltd

    • Upheld
    • Internet (website content)
    • 24 January 2024

    A website made two pricing claims that were misleading and could not be substantiated.

  • Get A Drip Ltd

    • Upheld
    • 20 December 2023

    The Get A Drip website www.getadrip.co.uk, seen 7 February 2019, listed the intravenous (IV) drip services it offered on a page headed “Our Menu”: “Bolt-Ons”; “Basic Hydration”; “MultiVit Drip”; “Energy Drip”; “Immunity Drip”; Detox Drip”; &l...

  • REVIV UK Ltd t/a REVIV

    • Upheld
    • 20 December 2023

    The website for REVIV UK, www.revivme.com/london, seen 1 April 2019, stated on the main page for its London clinic “REVIV IV infusion therapies deliver hydration, vitamins, and antioxidants helping to optimise vital hydration balance and maximise your wellness & efficiency. Whether looking to boost your immun...

  • South African Foods Ltd t/a Candy Store 4 You

    • Upheld
    • Social media (influencer or affiliate ad)
    • 06 December 2023

    A TikTok post on Saira Hayati’s account for sea salt made health and nutrition claims that were in breach of the rules and claimed to prevent, treat or cure human disease, which broke the rules.

  • Nimaya Mindstation Ltd

    • Upheld
    • Internet (website content), Social media (own site)
    • 15 November 2023

    A website and Instagram post claimed that hyperbaric oxygen therapy could treat long COVID, which was misleading and could not be substantiated, and discouaraged essential treatment for conditions for which medical supervision should be sought.

  • The Heal Air

    • Upheld
    • Internet (website content), Social media (own site)
    • 15 November 2023

    A website, Facebook post and Instagram post claimed that hyperbaric oxygen therapy could treat long COVID, which was misleading and could not be substantiated.

  • Indiralaxmi Vignesh Ltd t/a Hale Clinic

    • Upheld
    • Search (paid), Internet (website content)
    • 08 November 2023

    A website and paid-for search listing claimed that hyperbaric oxygen therapy could treat long Covid, which was misleading and couldn’t be substantiated.

  • NUMA Ltd

    • Upheld
    • Internet (website content), Social media (own site)
    • 08 November 2023

    A website and Facebook post claimed that hyperbaric oxygen therapy could treat long Covid, which was misleading and couldn’t be substantiated.

  • Dr Rani Ltd t/a Daily Chemist

    • Upheld
    • Search (paid)
    • 01 November 2023

    A paid-for search ad promoted asthma inhalers, which are prescription-only medicines, to the general public.

  • Shop TJC Ltd t/a TJC, The Jewellery Channel Ltd

    • Upheld
    • Television
    • 18 October 2023

    A teleshopping presentation for a light machine made medical claims for a device that had not been registered for those claims.

  • Direct Response Marketing Group Ltd t/a Wellform

    • Upheld
    • Press general, Circular
    • 20 September 2023

    Four press ads and two circulars were banned for making unsubstantiated claims that a supplement could treat human disease, including Alzheimer’s, featuring false testimonials and increasing fear and undue distress without justifiable reason in their approach to Alzheimer’s.

  • OrganicSupplies GB

    • Upheld
    • Internet (website content)
    • 13 September 2023

    A product listing for a B12 vitamin injection kit promoted a prescription-only medicine (POM) to the public.

  • Tony Parker t/a Dr Tony, AbilityBack

    • Upheld
    • Leaflet
    • 13 September 2023

    A leaflet for Ability Back Centres misleadingly claimed that a practitioner was a registered Chiropractor who held a general medical qualification.

  • The Chrysalis Effect Ltd

    • Upheld
    • 06 September 2023

    A website for a health coach provider misleadingly claimed that their recovery programme could aid in the recovery of chronic fatigue syndrome or provide full clinical recovery from it.

  • Jo Llewellyn Craniosacral Therapist

    • Upheld
    • Social media (paid ad), Social media (own site)
    • 30 August 2023

    A paid-for Facebook ad and an Instagram post for a craniosacral therapist implied that craniosacral therapists could treat long covid without robust evidence.

  • Peachy Acupuncture

    • Upheld
    • Social media (paid ad), Social media (own site)
    • 30 August 2023

    An Instagram post for an Acupuncturist’s page implied that acupuncture could contribute to the treatment of long covid or symptoms of it without robust evidence and promoted prescription-only medicines to the general public.

  • Serenity Acupuncture

    • Upheld
    • Internet (website content), Social media (own site)
    • 30 August 2023

    A paid-for Facebook ad and website for an Acupuncturist implied that acupuncture could contribute to the treatment of long covid without robust evidence.

  • MH Optical Limited t/a Panoptica Opticians

    • Upheld
    • Internet (website content)
    • 16 August 2023

    A website for an opticians claimed their products could treat dyslexia.

  • Dirtea Ltd t/a Dirtea

    • Upheld
    • Social media (own site)
    • 28 June 2023

    Five Instagram posts on the Dirtea Instagram page and a paid-for Facebook ad claimed the product could prevent, treat or cure various human diseases.